BOWERY


Bowery


The Bowery  is a street and neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street runs from Chatham Square at Park Row, Worth Street, and Mott Street in the south to Cooper Square at 4th Street in the north, while the neighborhood's boundaries are roughly East 4th Street and the East Village to the north; Canal Street and Chinatown to the south; Allen  Street and the Lower East Side to the east; and Little Italy to the west.

In the 17th century, the road branched off Broadway north of Fort Amsterdam at the tip of Manhattan to the homestead of Peter Stuyvesant, Director-General of New Netherland. The street was known as Bowery Lane prior to 1807. "Bowery" is an anglicization of the Dutch bouwerij, derived from an antiquated Dutch word for "farm", as in the 17th century the area contained many large farms.

 A New York City Subway station named Bowery, serving the BMT Nassau Street Line (JZ trains), is located close to the Bowery's intersection with Delancey and Kenmare Streets. There is a tunnel under the Bowery once intended for use by proposed but never built New York City Subway services, including the Second Avenue Subway.                                                                    
                         
                    



LOWER EAST SIDE


Lower East Side


An inexhaustible array of bars, clubs, and diverse communities with untouchable NYC mystique.

Slightly dodgy in a desirable way, the Lower East Side exudes an uncanny charm. Cramped spaces, rusty fire escapes, and gritty alleyways only add to its artful appeal. An eclectic neighborhood grown from immigrant roots, the Lower East Side supplies ample excitement around every corner—whether you’re grabbing coffee at one of its trendy cafes or partying scandalously until the break of dawn.

Lower East Side is within Manhattan and bordered by East Village, Alphabet City, Little Italy, Noho, Soho, Nolita, and Chinatown



LaGuardia Airport: 20 minutes by cab without traffic
JFK Airport: 30 minutes by cab without traffic
Times Square: 19 minutes by subway 
Wall Street / Financial District: 15 minutes by subway


Education

The Lower East Side Preparatory High School is a second-chance school that enables students, aged 17–21, to obtain their high school diplomas. It is a bilingual Chinese-English school with a high proportion of Asian students.The Seward Park Campus comprises five schools with an average graduation rate of about 80%. The original school in the building was opened 1929 and closed 2006.            
    

Transportation

There are multiple New York City Subway stations in the neighborhood, including Grand Street (BD), Bowery (JZ), Second Avenue (F), Delancey Street – Essex Street (FJMZ), and East Broadway (F). New York City Bus routes include M9, M14A, M14D, M15, M15 SBS, M21, M22, M103, B39. The Williamsburg Bridge and Manhattan Bridge connect the Lower East Side to Brooklyn. TheFDR Drive is on the neighborhood's south and east ends.

There are multiple bike lanes in the area. Bike lanes are present on Allen, Chrystie, Clinton, Delancey, Grand, Houston, Montgomery, Madison,Rivington, Stanton, and Suffolk Streets; Bowery, East Broadway, and FDR Drive; the Williamsburg and Manhattan bridges; and the East River Greenway. The Lower East Side is expected to be served by the Citywide Ferry Service starting in 2018.                                                          
               
               
 

EAST VILLAGE


East Village


Independent bookshops, cafes, bars, clubs, and bohemian culture in a laid-back NYC favorite.

Boasting the best of, well, everything, the East Village’s inexhaustible grid of beyond-hip bars, bookshops, cafes, clubs, and galleries cater to even the most exacting tastes. As stylish as it is, the East Village preserves a laid-back attitude so even outsiders feel welcome when in this classic New York City neighborhood. From early morning to late-late night, the East Village brims with activity for socialites and scalawags alike.

East Village is within Manhattan and bordered by Alphabet City, Lower East Side, Noho, Greenwich Village, Flatiron District, Kips Bay, Soho, Nolita, Union Square, and Gramercy Park



JFK Airport: 30 minutes by cab without traffic
LaGuardia Airport: 20 minutes by cab without traffic
Times Square: 23 minutes by subway
Wall Street / Financial District: 22 minutes by subway


Colleges

New York University

Along with gentrification, the East Village has seen an increase in the number of buildings owned and maintained by New York University, particularly dormitories for undergraduate students, and this influx has given rise to conflict between the community and the university.

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure with a Romanesque Revival tower on East 12th Street that dated to 1847, was sold to NYU to make way for a 26-story, 700-bed dormitory. After community protest, the university promised to protect and maintain the church's original facade; and so it did, literally, by having the facade stand alone in front of the building, now the tallest structure in the area.  

According to many residents, NYU's alteration and demolition of historic buildings, such as the Peter Cooper Post Office, is spoiling the physical and socio-economic landscape that makes this neighborhood so interesting and attractive.
NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages due to its expansive development plans; urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s. "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs", said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.


Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, founded in 1859 by entrepreneur and philanthropist Peter Cooper and located on Cooper Square, is one of the most selective colleges in the world, and formerly offered tuition-free programs in engineering, art and architecture. Its Great Hall is famous as a platform for historic speeches, notably Abraham Lincoln's Cooper Union speech, and its New Academic Building is the first in New York City to achieve LEED Platinum Status.